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equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
it was intended to do. >> host: in "the debt bomb," you have duplication in federal programs, science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs, there are 209 of those. service transportation, 100 plus. teacher quality, 82 programs. economic development, 88. transportation assistance, 80. financial literacy, 56 different programs. job training, 47 different job--training programs. homelessness prevention and assistance, 20 programs. food for the hungry, 18, and disaster response preparedness/fema, 7 different programs. >> guest: well, it's not, it's not just outlandish that we have that many programs, what is also outlandish is we don't know if they're working. because when they're passed, there's nothing that says you have to have a metric to see if it's accomplishing the goal, and the biggest defect of the congress since i've been here has been the total lack of oversight of most of the programs. >> host: you recount in "the debt bomb" a story about taking an amendment to the senate floor to get rid of some of these duplication, duplicative programs. what happened? >> guest: uh -- >> ho
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
times the total investment made of r&d, science and education. if we permit that to happen we are assured a slow-growth crisis that is what will happen if we don't do anything. mike, please takeover. >> i don't claim to be an economics expert. but from the national security standpoint i have felt for years not just the health of our economy around the world but those that generate positive outcome and from the defense standpoint as pointed out if said that continues to grow it will continue to eat at us and when you put in good time bomb of the sequestration it was supposed to be so heinous that congress would never permit it to happen but yet we're on the verge andover what we have been fighting over the last decade at a time when there is clearly increasing pressure on the defense budget and i have said it should pay its fair share. with the media impact to get to a part of your question and i worry about the acceleration to create a hollow force very rapidly. and the president does what he says he will he takes it off the books of any cuts with the totality focused on a ver
the 60th anniversary of the graduate research fellowship program of the senate science foundation. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. cardin: i further ask that the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table with no intervening action or debate and any statements related to the matter be printed at the appropriate place in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cardin: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today it adjourn until 9:30 a.m. on thursday, december 6, 2012, that following the prayer and pledge, the journal be approved to date, the morning business be deemed expired and the time for the leaders be reserved for the use later in the day. that following the leaders' remarks the senate be in a period of morning business until 11:45 a.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each with the previous order regarding retirement speeches remaining in effect and followi
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6